We are all Made In Space

Made In Space blog

Made In Space & Braskem take Green technology to the International Space Station

Image credit: NASA

Image credit: NASA

The partnership between Braskem and Made In Space gives astronauts greater autonomy by enabling them to fabricate parts and tools using 3D printing

Green Plastic, which is made from sugarcane, is now being used to fabricate parts in space, thanks to a partnership between Braskem, the largest thermoplastic resin producer in the Americas, and U.S.-based Made In Space, the leading developer of zero gravity 3D printers and an official supplier to NASA. The technology allows astronauts to fabricate tools and spare parts in space using the biobased resin, which effectively increases the autonomy of space missions.

The first part made from the raw material outside of Earth was a pipe connector for a vegetable irrigation system, which was fabricated by the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), the first commercial 3D printer permanently allocated in space. The equipment, which will fabricate various types of parts using GreenPE (TM) plastic, is located on the International Space Station (ISS) and was developed by Made In Space with the support of the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS).

For over a year, Braskem’s Innovation & Technology team has been working with Made In Space to develop a Green Plastic solution especially for 3D printing in zero gravity. The partnership will enable astronauts to receive by e-mail digital designs of the parts and then print them, which means dramatic savings in terms of time and costs. “Through this partnership, we combined one of the greatest innovations in polymers, Green Plastic, with advanced space technology to print 3D objects in zero gravity. Putting a renewable polymer in space for printing applications represents an important milestone in our history,” said Patrick Teyssonneyre, director of Innovation & Technology at Braskem.

Polyethylene made from sugarcane was the material chosen for the project because of its combination of properties, such as flexibility, chemical resistance and recyclability, and also because it is made from a renewable resource. There are great expectations surrounding the project’s benefits, since 3D printing in space was defined by NASA as one of the advances essential for a future mission to Mars. “The ability to print parts and tools in 3D on demand increases the reliability and safety of space missions. This partnership with Braskem is fundamental for diversifying the raw materials used by the AMF and for making this technology more robust and versatile,” said Andrew Rush, CEO of Made In Space.

Braskem’s technology is also present in the structure of the actual printer. The equipment’s printing bed is made of Braskem’s ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), which is marketed under the brand UTEC®. The resin provides increased tack for printing with Green Polyethylene and offers mechanical properties, such as superior abrasion and impact resistance.

From Space to Earth

The project should drive the development of solutions that go beyond manufacturing in space to create opportunities for innovations in polyolefin applications. Braskem’s innovation team is ready to create solutions in Green Plastic and to make them specific for 3D printing. “The technology has the potential to impact the plastics chain by enabling new applications and mass personalization made with a renewable resource,” said Gustavo Sergi, director of Renewable Chemicals at Braskem.

Reinforcing the relevance of its environmental aspect, a new Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of Green Plastic indicated the removal of 2.78 tons of CO 2 for each ton of biobased resin produced. The study was conducted by the consulting firm ACV Brasil and subjected to a technical review by a panel formed by the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research GmbH (IFEU) and Michigan State University.

About I’m Green (TM) Green Plastic

I’m Green plastic is made from ethylene derived from sugarcane ethanol. Its greatest advantage is helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the air by capturing carbon gas during its production. It also features the same properties as traditional polyethylene, which means that manufacturers do not have to change their machinery and that it can be recycled.

About Braskem

Braskem is the largest thermoplastic resin producer in the Americas, with annual production volume of over 20 million tons, which includes other chemicals and basic petrochemicals, and annual revenue of R$54 billion. Driven by its purpose of improving people’s lives and creating sustainable solutions in chemicals and plastics, Braskem operates in more than 70 countries, has around 8,000 Team Members and operates 40 industrial units in Brazil, the United States, Germany and Mexico, the latter in partnership with the Mexican company Idesa.

About CASIS

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) was selected by NASA in July 2011 to maximize use of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory through 2020. CASIS is dedicated to supporting and accelerating innovations and new discoveries that will enhance the health and wellbeing of people and our planet. For more information, visit www.iss-casis.org.

Additive Manufacturing Facility installed on ISS

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION, LOW EARTH ORBIT- In an historic first, the first ever space-based commercial manufacturing facility was installed on the International Space Station on Wednesday morning.

“For us, this moment is exciting because we can say, ‘we’re open for business!’” said Made In Space CEO Andrew Rush. Teaming with both NASA and commercial companies, Made In Space developed the system, called the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), which uses advanced 3D printing technology specifically designed for the unique microgravity environment of the ISS. “This is a big moment for commercial space,” said Rush, “With AMF, for the first time customers and researchers can manufacture useful objects in space, rather than having to launch.”

This is one of the unique aspects of AMF. Often the ISS is used to host experiments designed to answer specific questions for NASA or a scientific funding organization. AMF, however, can be accessed by any Earthbound customer for job-specific work, like a machine shop in space. Example use cases include, a medical device company prototyping space optimized designs, or a satellite manufacturer testing new deployable geometries, or creating tools for ISS crew members. According to Matt Napoli, Vice President of In-Space Operations, AMF currently has about six-month of prints in the queue.

Additive manufacturing in microgravity, the key enabling technology of AMF, began its life through NASA’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, and is the second technological iteration of a 3D printing experiment that went to the ISS in 2014. “The NASA SBIR
program is essentially a government venture capitalist providing funding for small firms like us to turn a concept developed in our garage into a reality, in space!” Rush explains. Made In Space has also partnered with Lowe’s Innovation Labs (NYSE: LOW) and CASIS, which manages the ISS National Lab, to develop, launch, and spin up the facility installed today.

For business inquiries please contact Matthew Napoli at business@madeinspace.us
For press inquiries please contact Spencer Pitman at spencer@madeinspace.us

Made In Space’s work with NASA has led to success on Earth

Made In Space technology on display on Earth thanks to commercial partnerships

Lowes Team

January 19th, 2015 – Sunnyvale, CA – The first ever in-space manufacturing was made possible through a NASA and Made In Space (MIS) collaboration called the “3D Printing in Zero-Gravity Experiment.” The experiment was a critical pathfinder for both NASA and MIS and involved building the first zero-gravity 3D printer; designated “3D Print.” The promising results from that experiment have given MIS and NASA the confidence to further invest in proving out the case for off-world additive manufacturing.

The, “3D Printing in Zero-Gravity Experiment,” consisted of printing a series of 14 unique shapes, some multiple times, to determine material properties of objects that are 3D printed in space. The overwhelming success of this initial in-space manufacturing experiment has laid the groundwork for MIS to build the successor device; the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF). Soon the AMF will be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory (ISS National Laboratory) becoming a commercially available facility designed to last the entire lifetime of the space station itself. “The AMF would not be possible without our work with NASA on the 3D printing in space experiment made possible by the first zero-G 3D printer,” said Andrew Rush, President of Made In Space.

The Made In Space AMF on display at Lowe’s in Sunnyvale, CA
The Made In Space AMF on display at Lowe’s in Sunnyvale, CA

Astronauts aboard the ISS will not be the only ones benefiting from the addition of the AMF to the ISS. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) has reached an agreement with MIS to identify, evaluate and manifest research opportunities capable of benefitting life on Earth through 3D printing in microgravity. CASIS is the organization tasked by NASA to manage, promote and broker research onboard the ISS U.S. National Laboratory. Via CASIS, AMF will be utilized to conduct science and research for high schools, universities, medical doctors, research groups, corporations, non-profits, and even private individuals.

In October, Made in Space and Lowe’s Innovation Labs, the disruptive innovation hub of Lowe’s Companies, Inc., announced they would become the first to launch a commercial 3D printer to space. The printer is slated to arrive at the International Space Station (ISS) early this year and will bring tools and technology to astronauts in space. As part of this initiative, a demonstration display of the AMF will be housed at the Lowe’s Sunnydale, Calif. store starting this month and will provide customers with a fun, interactive ISS-themed experience. Despite the Earth-centric nature of these new Made In Space commercial activities, none of this could have happened without NASA’s commitment to seeing 3D printing in space become a reality.

About CASIS
The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) was selected by NASA in July 2011 to maximize use of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory through 2020. CASIS is dedicated to supporting and accelerating innovations and new discoveries that will enhance the health and wellbeing of people and our planet. For more information, visit: www.iss-casis.org.

About the ISS National Laboratory
In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation’s newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users, and advancing STEM education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low Earth orbit, and varied environments of space.

About Made In Space
Founded in 2010 as the world’s first space manufacturing company, Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) has become a world leader in utilizing 3D printing for aerospace applications. In 2014, a NASA/Made In Space team sent the world’s first 3D printer to the International Space Station (ISS). In partnership with CASIS, managers of the ISS National Lab, and Lowe’s Innovation Labs, the disruptive technology hub of the Lowe’s Home Improvement chain, Made In Space will be sending the first commercial 3D printer to the ISS next year, designated the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF). Additionally, the firm was recently awarded a NASA contract to 3D print and assemble structures in the vacuum of space using their Archinaut architecture.

About LOWE’S
Lowe’s Companies, Inc. (NYSE: LOW) is a FORTUNE® 50 home improvement company serving approximately 16 million customers a week in the United States, Canada and Mexico through its stores and online at Lowes.com, Lowes.ca and Lowes.com.mx. With fiscal year 2014 sales of $56.2 billion, Lowe’s has more than 1,845 home improvement and hardware stores and 265,000 employees. Founded in 1946 and based in Mooresville, North Carolina, Lowe’s supports the communities it serves through programs that focus on K-12 public education and community improvement projects. For more information, visit Lowes.com.

Contact:
Brad Kohlenberg
brad@madeinspace.us
media@madeinspace.us

NASA Selects Made In Space Proposal for Next Generation Space Manufacturing Program

NASA Headquarters has selected Made In Space, Inc. to lead the next phase in the ongoing development of in-space manufacturing.

Archinaut progression

November 19, 2015 – Mountain View, CA – NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate announced its selection of the Made In Space project proposal for utilizing public-private partnerships to advance Tipping Point Technologies. The NASA funded project, designated “Archinaut,” is designed to develop the necessary technologies and subsystems which will enable the first additive manufacturing, aggregation, and assembly of large and complex systems in space without astronaut extravehicular activity.

“Archinaut is being designed from the ground up to be a truly cross-cutting technology, providing entirely new space capabilities for NASA and other government missions as well as both pre-existing commercial satellite manufacturers and emerging commercial space platforms,” said Andrew Rush, President of Made In Space.

To capitalize on this NASA provided opportunity, Made In Space is teaming up with Northrop Grumman and Oceaneering Space Systems in order to leverage their unique expertise. Made in Space will lead the team, applying their established space-based additive manufacturing technology. Northrop Grumman will provide expertise in electronic interfaces and external thermal control analysis. Oceaneering Space Systems will design and build the manipulator arm.

“In addition to transforming the current state-of-the-art for space manufacturing, the development of the Archinaut capability will be a great opportunity for Made In Space to collaborate with established space companies which possess complimentary resources and proven expertise,” said Mike Snyder, Co-Founder and Chief Engineer.

The full vision of Archinaut will enable spacecraft which manufacture and assemble unlaunchable structures once on orbit, enabling new mission capabilities such as large antennas and base stations. The initial Archinaut Phase I program will perform a series of technology demonstrations in order to bring the final technical hurdles beyond the tipping point for commercial feasibility.

Archinaut follows Made in Space’s previous work with NASA in developing additive manufacturing for space, including the demonstrator, “3D Printing in Zero-G Experiment,” currently deployed aboard ISS, and the commercially operated Additive Manufacturing Facility, scheduled for launch in the first half of 2016.

“Archinaut is a major milestone on the roadmap for bringing large scale manufacturing to space. This announcement is a result of the technology development that has been underway since our company’s inception and sets the stage for what is to come in both the public and private sectors,” said Jason Dunn, Co-Founder and CTO Jason Dunn.

About NASA’s Tipping Point Technologies

A technology relevant to NASA is considered at the tipping point if an investment in a demonstration of its capabilities would result in a significant advancement of the technology’s maturation, high likelihood of infusion into a commercial space application, and significant improvement in the ability to successfully bring the technology to market.

About Made In Space

Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) was founded in 2010 as the world’s first space manufacturing company. MIS was contracted by NASA to design, build, and operate the 3D Printing In Zero-G Experiment (3D Print) on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014. 3D Print became the first machine to manufacture off-Earth. Controlled from a mission operations center at MIS HQ in the NASA Ames Research Park, the device allows for hardware to be digitally sent to space and printed out. By the end of 2015 the company will launch a new 3D printer, the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), to provide hardware manufacturing services to both NASA and the U.S. National Laboratory onboard the ISS. As the first commercially available manufacturing service in space, the AMF will put the capability of off-world manufacturing in the hands of space developers everywhere.

Contact:
Brad Kohlenberg
Business Development, Media, Marketing – Made In Space
brad@madeinspace.us
media@madeinspace.us

The Next Frontier of Retail: Lowe’s is First to Launch Commercial 3D Printer into Space

Lowe’s Innovation Labs unveils latest sci-fi-inspired solutions with Made in Space, Google

October 29, 2015 – Mooresville, N.C.Lowe’s Innovation Labs, the disruptive innovation hub of Lowe’s Companies, Inc., has partnered with aerospace company Made in Space, to become the first to launch a commercial 3D printer to space. The printer, the first permanent additive manufacturing facility for the International Space Station (ISS), will bring tools and technology to astronauts in space. At the same time here on earth, Lowe’s is launching the next-generation Lowe’s Holoroom – an in-store and at-home virtual reality design tool that enables customers to envision the room of their dreams.

First Retailer in Space
Lowe’s 3D printer is slated to arrive at the ISS in early 2016, making Lowe’s the first retailer to have a presence in space. From 200 miles above Earth, astronauts can use 3D printing technology to create a tool on-demand and produce parts they may not have onboard and immediately available. Customers are already using Lowe’s Innovation Labs’ 3D scanning and printing services to produce custom or hard-to-find replacement parts.

“Lowe’s and Made in Space share a vision of how 3D printing can revolutionize retail and home improvement, while also changing the way astronauts work in space,” said Kyle Nel, executive director of Lowe’s Innovation Labs. “This is just the beginning of a broader partnership with Made in Space that will bring tools to space and new technology to Earth.”

“For the first time, astronauts can now manufacture what they need, when they need it in space,” said Jason Dunn, founder of Made in Space. “We have successfully demonstrated the technology’s capabilities in space. And now with the launch of the permanent additive manufacturing facility to the ISS, we are enabling humanity to manufacture things off the planet.”

Next-Generation Holoroom
In 2014, Lowe’s Innovation Labs introduced its first proof of concept, the Lowe’s Holoroom. The augmented reality design experience was successfully tested in stores in the Toronto area for six months and led to the next-generation Lowe’s Holoroom that will be installed in 19 stores across the United States beginning next month.

The Holoroom has evolved from a single platform augmented reality solution to a virtual reality design and visualization tool that leverages Oculus Rift optic technology in stores and Google Cardboard viewers that consumers can take home.

Lowe’s Innovation Labs and Google collaborated to create a shareable Holoroom experience that combines YouTube’s 360-degree video capabilities with Google Cardboard to enable customers to enjoy and share their virtual kitchen or bathroom design whenever and wherever they choose.

“The next-generation Holoroom continues to fulfill our long-term vision for how augmented and virtual reality technologies can help customers have more confidence and more fun with home improvement,” Nel said. “We can’t wait to see what our customers create as they bring their imagination to life with these new tools.”

Lowe’s created Lowe’s Innovation Labs in 2014 to develop disruptive technologies by bringing together uncommon partners with a commitment to get technology out of the lab and into the real world. In its first year, Lowe’s Innovation Labs collaborated with startups to introduce the first-generation Lowe’s Holoroom, the OSHbot autonomous retail service robot and in-store and online 3D scanning and printing.

Click here to access and download press kit, photos and video footage.

About Lowe’s
Lowe’s Companies, Inc. (NYSE: LOW) is a FORTUNE® 50 home improvement company serving approximately 16 million customers a week in the United States, Canada and Mexico through its stores and online at Lowes.com, Lowes.ca and Lowes.com.mx. With fiscal year 2014 sales of $56.2 billion, Lowe’s has more than 1,845 home improvement and hardware stores and 265,000 employees. Founded in 1946 and based in Mooresville, N.C., Lowe’s supports the communities it serves through programs that focus on K-12 public education and community improvement projects. For more information, visit Lowes.com. For more information on Lowe’s Innovation Labs, visit LowesInnovationLabs.com.

About Made in Space
Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) was founded in 2010 as the world’s first space manufacturing company. MIS was contracted by NASA to design, build, and operate the 3D Printing In Zero-G Experiment (3D Print) on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014. 3D Print became the first machine to manufacture off-Earth. Controlled from a mission operations center at MIS HQ in the NASA Ames Research Park, the device allows for hardware to be digitally sent to space and printed out. By the end of 2015 the company will launch a new 3D printer, the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), to provide hardware manufacturing services to both NASA and the U.S. National Laboratory onboard the ISS. As the first commercially available manufacturing service in space, the AMF will put the capability of off-world manufacturing in the hands of space developers everywhere.

Made In Space and NanoRacks Take First Steps Towards On-Orbit Satellite Manufacturing, Assembly and Deployment

Commercial Collaboration Promises New Opportunities for CubeSat Ventures

CubeSat Slide
Mountain View, CA – August 11, 2015 – Made In Space, the space manufacturing company, and NanoRacks, the premier provider of commercial low-Earth orbit services, are partnering to provide a transformative new service for CubeSat developers: the Stash & Deploy satellite deployment service. The Stash & Deploy service will leverage NanoRacks’ heritage in CubeSat deployment and Made In Space’s in-space additive manufacturing capabilities to deliver on-demand satellite manufacturing, assembly, and deployment to the space environment. A variety of standard and customer-specific satellite components will be cached aboard a satellite deployment platform, such as the International Space Station. These components are “stashed” for rapid manufacture of CubeSats. Made In Space’s Additive Manufacturing Facility will be used to create custom structure, optimized for both the space environment and customer need.

“This is a fundamental shift for satellite production,” says Andrew Rush, president of Made In Space. “In the near future, we envision that satellites will be manufactured quickly and to the customer’s exact needs, without being overbuilt to survive launch or have to wait for the next launch.”

As envisioned, customers will easily and quickly design their satellite or request a satellite be designed based on their requirements. Once designed, the optimized structure is created on orbit and the necessary components are integrated. The satellite will then be deployed into low Earth orbit. The entire assembly and deployment process will occur in a fraction of the time necessary to build, manifest, launch and deploy satellites from the ground, For the first time, incredibly valuable responsiveness will be available to satellite operators. “Stash and deploy opens a new chapter in space utilization,” believes Jeffrey Manber, CEO of NanoRacks. “Looking out a few years this option may be more desirable than launch and deploy.”

The Stash & Deploy service makes on-orbit assembly and deployment of small satellites a powerful option for operators looking to push the envelope of modern space development and deploy hardware faster than traditional CubeSat deployment. “Made In Space was founded with the belief that one day entire spacecraft will be manufactured in space. With Stash & Deloy, NanoRacks and Made In Space make the first step towards this goal,” says Made In Space’s CTO and Co-Founder, Jason Dunn.

The first steps of the Stash & Deploy service will be available Q1 2016. To explore further the Stash & Deploy service, contact rpournelle@nanoracks.com and business@madeinspace.us

About Made In Space

Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) was founded in 2010 as the world’s first space manufacturing company. MIS was contracted by NASA to design, build, and operate the 3D Printing In Zero-G Experiment (3D Print) on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014. 3D Print became the first machine to manufacture off-Earth. Controlled from a mission operations center at MIS HQ in the NASA Ames Research Park, the device allows for hardware to be digitally sent to space and printed out. By the end of 2015 the company will launch a new 3D printer, the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), to provide hardware manufacturing services to both NASA and the U.S. National Laboratory onboard the ISS. As the first commercially available manufacturing service in space, the AMF will put the capability of off-world manufacturing in the hands of space developers everywhere.

About NanoRacks

NanoRacks LLC was formed in 2009 to provide commercial hardware and services for the U.S. National Laboratory onboard the International Space Station via a Space Act Agreement with NASA. NanoRacks’ main office is in Houston, Texas, right alongside the NASA Johnson Space Center. The Business Development office is in Washington, DC., and NanoRacks’ now has a new office in Silicon Valley, California. The Company has grown into the Operating System for Space Utilization by having the tools, the hardware and the services to allow other companies, organizations and governments to realize their own space plans.
To date over 200 payloads have been deployed by the Company on the International Space Station and our customer base includes the European Space Agency (ESA) the German Space Agency (DLR,) the American space agency (NASA,) US Government Agencies, Planet Labs, Urthecast, Space Florida, NCESSE, Virgin Galactic, pharmaceutical drug companies, and organizations in Vietnam, UK, Romania and Israel. Our customer base has propelled NanoRacks into a leadership position in understanding the emerging commercial market for low-earth orbit utilization.

Made In Space Announces In-Vacuum Additive Manufacturing Breakthrough

3D printing now possible outside the ISS, in the vacuum of space.

vac hd

Mountain View, CA – August, 7th 2015 – Made In Space has announced a breakthrough in their efforts to develop manufacturing technologies for extra terrestrial applications. Following on from their successes in printing on the International Space Station, Made In Space has been working on ways to operate outside the International Space Station in the vacuum of space. Last month Made In Space successfully completed a round of tests, proving that their next generation of 3D printers can operate in the vacuum of space.

Last year, Made In Space became the first company to build and operate additive manufacturing hardware in space when their hardware completed the first mission phase of NASA’s 3D Printing in Zero-G Technology Demonstration. The printer produced twenty-four parts that have since been returned to Earth for laboratory analysis. This mission was a precursor to the company’s completely commercial Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) which will fly later this year to the International Space Station.

“We believe we are as little as 18 months away from incorporating the current designs into on-orbit tests,” said Mike Snyder, Chief Engineer at Made In Space, “These preliminary tests, combined with our experience with microgravity additive manufacturing, show that the direct manufacturing of structures in space is possible using Made In Space developed technologies. Soon, structures will be produced in space that are much larger than what could currently fit into a launch fairing, designed for microgravity rather than launch survivability. Complete structural optimization is now possible in space.”

Made In Space tested a modified version of their AMF, with their proprietary vacuum-compatible extrusion heads, and accumulated over a week of testing in a vacuum chamber. Various specimens were produced using aerospace-grade thermopolymers to test how the deposition process works in the vacuum environment. Those specimens will be tested this month to determine if any mechanical properties differ when compared to parts produced in Earth atmosphere. Preliminary results suggest that the vacuum-based 3D printing process works as expected, without any show stoppers.

About Made In Space

Made In Space, Inc. (MIS) was founded in 2010 as the world’s first space manufacturing company. MIS was contracted by NASA to design, build, and operate the 3D Printing In Zero-G Experiment (3D Print) on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014. 3D Print became the first machine to manufacture off-Earth. Controlled from a mission operations center at MIS HQ in the NASA Ames Research Park, the device allows for hardware to be digitally sent to space and printed out. By the end of 2015 the company will launch a new 3D printer, the Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF), to provide hardware manufacturing services to both NASA and the U.S. National Laboratory onboard the ISS. As the first commercially available manufacturing service in space, the AMF will put the capability of off-world manufacturing in the hands of space developers everywhere.

2015 ISS R&D Innovation Award – Technology Development

Today we were humbled and honored to receive the Innovation Award for Technology Development from the 2015 International Space Station Research and Development (ISSR&D) conference.

imagejpeg_0
The award was received by our Chief Technology Officer and Co-founder, Jason Dunn, on behalf of the entire 3d printing team, including both the Made In Space team and the in-space manufacturing team at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC).

The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and NASA continue to be integral to not only our success but the success of the commercial space movement in general; which is breathing new life into a promising industry of America. We are proud to be a piece of this new economic landscape being seeded by the government and cultivated by private enterprise.

IMG_3383

Our greatest gratitude to the American Astronautical Society for sponsoring the event, and to CASIS and NASA for selecting us for this prestigious award. This is still just the beginning, and we look forward to working together with these outstanding groups as we continue to explore and develop the future of in-space manufacturing.

Made In Space 3-D Printing on International Space Station Is a Go for San Jose’s Valley Christian Schools Students

Junior High & High School Students are the World’s First to Manufacture in Space

VCS-MIS (8 of 10)2011-1000

SAN JOSE, Calif., June 1st – Zero-gravity additive manufacturing technology invented by Silicon Valley’s Made In Space, Inc. has made it possible for another first – Applied Math, Science and Engineering (AMSE) Institute students at Valley Christian Schools (VCS) will have their designs printed in 3-D this fall aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Exemplifying Made In Space’s goal to broaden access to space development, VCSstudents ranging in age from 11 to 18 years have been given unprecedented first access on Earth to use “in-space capabilities” deployed on the ISS.

VCJHS winner

“Our AMSE students are going to be part of a great new passion at NASA – on board manufacturing on the ISS. The files we design and create at VCS will be uploaded for output on the world’s only commercially available, space-qualified printer of 3-D objects. To move beyond Earth and live on other planets, we’ll have to manufacture in space. This opens up a whole new world of possibilities for business in space, and our students are among the first in the world to benefit from this game-changing technology experience,” says Werner Vavken – Vice President & Director of AMSE at VCS in San
Jose.

VCHS winner

On June 1st, the students from VCS will share their objects in a media event from 10am to 12pm at the Made In Space headquarters inside the NASA Park in Mountain View. High school students will showcase their innovative tool designs, while junior high students will display a “bust” of Astronaut Scott Kelly that will also be printed on orbit this fall. “We’re excited about launching a more sophisticated printer going up to ISS to print the students projects. It will print at a higher temperature with stronger plastics, which will help astronauts iterate their experiments faster. It’s an open platform for anyone who wants to get their hardware in space,” says Aaron Kemmer, Chief Executive Officer & Co-
founder at Made In Space.

About Valley Christian Schools
Valley Christian Schools (VCS) is a private, K-12 Christian school system located in the heart of Silicon Valley in San Jose, California. VCS provides rigorous college preparatory programs while offering a K-12 comprehensive education. VCS challenges students to aspire toward lives of character, service, and influence while pursuing their individual Quest for Excellence through A3 – Academic Achievement, Artistic Beauty, and Athletic Distinction.

About Made In Space
Founded in 2010 with the goal of enabling humanity’s future in space, Made In Space, Inc. has developed additive manufacturing technology for use in the space environment. By manufacturing space assets in space, as opposed to launching them from Earth, the company plans to accelerate and broaden space development while also providing unprecedented access for people on Earth to use in-space capabilities.

Made In Space is the latest America Makes Member

We are excited to announce that Made In Space is the latest America Makes member!

Part of the Made In Space team had the chance to tour the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) in Youngstown, Ohio last December. NAMII, better known as America Makes, focuses on advancing the capabilities of additive manufacturing technologies and training students and workers with the skills to utilize these technologies to grow our nation’s economy.

DSC_0181

Mike Snyder and Hasti Afsarifard view items on display at America Makes, including this 3D printed 3u CubeSat. (Photo credit: Aadam Soorma)

During the tour, we learned about current projects including challenges in additive manufacturing materials, process and certifications. America Makes announces project call topics and in addition to funding projects, America Makes facilitates collaborations between businesses, academia, non-profit organizations, and government agencies.

DSC_0184

Michael Hripko, Deputy Directory of Workforce and Educational Outreach at America Makes, showcases a 3D printed letter of commitment addressed to President Obama and signed by over 150 Maker universities pledging to provide students with engaging opportunities to create things. (Photo credit: Aadam Soorma)

President Obama mentioned this innovation institute in his 2013 State of the Union Address: “A once-shuttered warehouse is now a state-of-the-art lab where new workers are mastering the 3D printing that has the potential to revolutionize the way we make almost everything.”

About America Makes:

Based in Youngstown, Ohio, America Makes is an extensive network of more than 100 companies, non-profit organizations, academic institutions and government agencies from all over the U.S. America Makes was founded in August 2012 as the flagship institute for other National Network for Manufacturing Innovation (NNMI) institutes and is driven by the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM).

Engage with Us

Co-Pilot the Revolution